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Engine Oil Cooler

TarmoT

Well-Known Member
Feb 25, 2018
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Thermostat might work opposite but both plates will make same job.
In both cases, oil will be cooled by additional cooler when it is required (when temps are going up) and additional cooler will be not used when oil temps are below targeted level.
 

Bu11eT

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Staff member
Jun 30, 2018
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Germany · Schleswig-Holstein
Since I have my airtec oil cooler installed successfully I wanted to discuss another topic which I stumbled across: Checking the correct oil level.

So why is that a question? Well, since I have my oil cooler mounted with the fittings up, only the oil from the oil lines would return to the oil sump when I shut the car off.
Our manual states to let the engine oil warm up, shut the engine off, wait about 5mins and then check the dipstick.

If I do that with my oil cooler installed, the reading is obv always too high since the oil returns from the lines (luckily I've mounted the cooler fittings up otherwise the whole cooler content would've falsified the dipstick reading even more^^).
So I was thinking if it now makes sense to check the oil level with the car idling (like it's done on some Porsche cars) or directly after you switched it off. That way, I know exactly how much oil is in the oil sump because the excess oil gets pushed into the oil lines of the oil cooler.

What do you guys think about this topic? Thought it was kinda interesting :)
 
Last edited:

Bu11eT

Moderator
Staff member
Jun 30, 2018
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Germany · Schleswig-Holstein
The Oil Cooler manual will tell you exactly how much to add with the mounting the cooler. Check it when it's cold, just as belore. :)
manual only states to "top it up". not really an exact measure isnt it 😂
in addition, i've now mounted the cooler fittings up and not fittings down as the manual suggested. So not sure if the "top it up" clause applies
 
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GazmaN

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Staff member
Oct 28, 2018
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Darwin, Australia
I will receive my Airtec oil cooler tomorrow together with their header tank and catch can. Next week I will try to install everything and I can give some feedback.
Hey man, hope you are well. I know you've moved the car on but I see you still drop in from time to time. I've been looking at the Airtec catch can...

Assuming you ended up fitting it (?), I have a few questions:

How do you rate it? Should some sort of baffle / filter media be thrown into it? Should a check valve be installed?
 
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GazmaN

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Staff member
Oct 28, 2018
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Darwin, Australia
My track days in this thing are finished but N Garage here in Australia now has this as a direct fit, assuming you're happy to remove rad shroud. Just putting it out there:

 
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TarmoT

Well-Known Member
Feb 25, 2018
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2,905
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Poland
Hey man, hope you are well. I know you've moved the car on but I see you still drop in from time to time. I've been looking at the Airtec catch can...

Assuming you ended up fitting it (?), I have a few questions:

How do you rate it? Should some sort of baffle / filter media be thrown into it? Should a check valve be installed?
That catch can has no real baffles inside but has a separator. It is like most of cheap aftermarket "cans" but just 10-times more expensive ;)
 
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R Veloster N

Well-Known Member
Mar 5, 2019
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Rocky Mountains, US
The best Catch Cans; are a simple well constructed catch can, without any internal medium and an efficient separator.

Mediums are not required and don't distinguish them as a more efficient CC. Mediums can often cause internal engine breathing problems, ie, small filters, micron metal filters and steel wool, (i'll explain further below). Well manufactured cans permit a free flowing of vapor material and fluid into the bottom of the can. They settle quickly to the bottom of the can and are not picked up and recirculated from air flow.

Internal mediums trap & hold material and water/oil vapor, which aren't allowed to quickly settle to the bottom of the can. These vapros and material remain higher in the can, recirculated from the medium.

Carbon deposits are formed from water and oil vapor exposed to constant high high temps. They're literally baked on internal parts, it washes over. The more oil/water vapor that's trapped in the bottom of the CC quickly, the less issues with carbon buildup.

Another point to keep in mind is; Mediums will also freeze with water vapor from the crankcase, causing a air flow problem. If this occurs, such produces higher internal pressures and these higher pressure can cause blown seals, oil circulation/starvation issues, etc. This is why the CC needs to always be positioned near a stronger heat source so it will heat up quickly and allow both air and vapor to circulate.

Catch Cans also require maintenance; draining, flushing and cleaning to remain efficient. This process also includes the line a longer intervals than oil changes. Intervals need to coincide with oil changes. With a medium in the CC, it makes the 3 points listed above more difficult. The medium must also be removed and the same process applied then reinstalled.👍
 

newbtostandard

Active Member
Sep 23, 2019
192
129
43
Pennsylvania
The best Catch Cans; are a simple well constructed catch can, without any internal medium and an efficient separator.

Mediums are not required and don't distinguish them as a more efficient CC. Mediums can often cause internal engine breathing problems, ie, small filters, micron metal filters and steel wool, (i'll explain further below). Well manufactured cans permit a free flowing of vapor material and fluid into the bottom of the can. They settle quickly to the bottom of the can and are not picked up and recirculated from air flow.

Internal mediums trap & hold material and water/oil vapor, which aren't allowed to quickly settle to the bottom of the can. These vapros and material remain higher in the can, recirculated from the medium.

Carbon deposits are formed from water and oil vapor exposed to constant high high temps. They're literally baked on internal parts, it washes over. The more oil/water vapor that's trapped in the bottom of the CC quickly, the less issues with carbon buildup.

Another point to keep in mind is; Mediums will also freeze with water vapor from the crankcase, causing a air flow problem. If this occurs, such produces higher internal pressures and these higher pressure can cause blown seals, oil circulation/starvation issues, etc. This is why the CC needs to always be positioned near a stronger heat source so it will heat up quickly and allow both air and vapor to circulate.

Catch Cans also require maintenance; draining, flushing and cleaning to remain efficient. This process also includes the line a longer intervals than oil changes. Intervals need to coincide with oil changes. With a medium in the CC, it makes the 3 points listed above more difficult. The medium must also be removed and the same process applied then reinstalled.👍
This is all great info. Exactly why I went AddW1 V3 can. Has triple twister internal baffles, not micron filters or extra media. Seems to be doing a great job as well!
 
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