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Run in period

GazmaN

Well-Known Member
My thinking is that the engine is run at the factory, and the oil changed. This might not be the case but it's what I hope. My first oil change had elevated wear metals, but so did the 2nd and so will the 3rd. They decline every time until some point. But IF your main goal is to remove wear metals when the engine is young it's going to take more than one early oil change, I don't think they will wash out completely with 1 change. You chould probably change every 500 miles until they levelize if concerned about it.
Would really like to know what happens at the factory in this respect. @Y0UKN0WITSCHRIS do you know, or are you able to ask the engineers about this, mate?
 

R Veloster N

Well-Known Member
Well, I do know most of the engines for the US and Mexico are built in West Point, GA & Montgomery, AL.

As far as I can gather, read and recollect there is no run-in procedures at either plant. Hyundai assembles them to specifications and sends them to the chassis assembly plant. There is no run-in, at the end of the chassis assembly plant either.
 
Well, I do know most of the engines for the US and Mexico are built in West Point, GA & Montgomery, AL.

As far as I can gather, read and recollect there is no run-in procedures at either plant. Hyundai assembles them to specifications and sends them to the chassis assembly plant. There is no run-in, at the end of the chassis assembly plant either.
Yup. Most manufacturers don't do it because it takes time and money (the machine doing the run-in is really expensive). I only know of Honda/Acura doing it for the NSX and Porsche for their GT cars.
 

Y0UKN0WITSCHRIS

Well-Known Member
Would really like to know what happens at the factory in this respect. @Y0UKN0WITSCHRIS do you know, or are you able to ask the engineers about this, mate?
I know of this: http://www.madeinalabama.com/2016/10/test-track-workouts/
But I’d say that’s as far as they go as breaking stuff in. But other than that I’m sure the boys at the port have a blast revving and generally abusing the “fun” cars that they load onto the trucks before the dealers get them.. But next time he’s in I’ll run it by him and see what he has to say
 

GazmaN

Well-Known Member
Yup. Most manufacturers don't do it because it takes time and money (the machine doing the run-in is really expensive). I only know of Honda/Acura doing it for the NSX and Porsche for their GT cars.
I've had a factory tour at Lamborghini and they run in every engine that leaves the factory. When I was there they were doing an Aventador. The engine is placed on a bench with all kind of sensors and then they run the crap out of it. Nothing gently and very harsh on the engine. Takes about half an our. After that they let the engine cool down, built it in the car, change the oil and that's it. That's were I gave up being to easy on a new engine...
 
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SS1981

Active Member
I’d expect that level of care/thought from a Lamborghini, I doubt Hyundai would bother to do the same, our cars probably cost the same as a set of wheels for an adventador
 

iiNNEX

Well-Known Member
I've had a factory tour at Lamborghini and they run in every engine that leaves the factory. When I was there they were doing an Aventador. The engine is placed on a bench with all kind of sensors and then they run the crap out of it. Nothing gently and very harsh on the engine. Takes about half an our. After that they let the engine cool down, built it in the car, change the oil and that's it. That's were I gave up being to easy on a new engine...
That's exactly why I do not follow Hyundai's silly "gentle 600 miles" bs, if you do not WOT in the first 60 miles, when your piston rings are expanding and in turn providing a better seal, then you've done nothing better for the engine.

It's especially funny when people drive like a grandma for 600 miles, then after that it's WOT and boost everywhere, like that literally makes no sense. Drive it how you want it to be driven for the rest of it's life or don't bother :)

Check this out: http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
 

R Veloster N

Well-Known Member
Pat McGivern is a self made authority. He's had this same website for a nearly two decades and doesn't update it very often. He's done little to no personal testing with the theory but touts it like he's an authority.
 

iiNNEX

Well-Known Member
Pat McGivern is a self made authority. He's had this same website for a nearly two decades and doesn't update it very often. He's done little to no personal testing with the theory but touts it like he's an authority.
Perhaps he is, however I've seen his words mentioned on other forums too and it makes sense when you think about it.

Now whether or not someone will actually go out to do some scientific testing about the fact, I don't know but to me it makes sense.
 
Should be OK at slower motorway speeds.

The best advice I've seen is to vary your engine speed. Even if the car is moving at constant speed you can change gear every now an then then try to accelerate and slow down a little as traffic allows. It's not really the speed that's the issue it's the engine rpm.

High speed on the motorway would not be good since you would not be able to drop a gear without going over 3000rpm, but slower speeds should be fine.
Soz. I don't think that is correct. My i30N will easy do over 80mph (I was doing 74 officer) around 3000rpm in top gear. In fact, I did a quick overtake the other day and just flexed the engine to about 3500rpm without a heavy throttle or any sensation of overloading the engine at all. Odometer reading: 115miles. Yep, you read that right folks. 115miles. Makes me wonder what the b'stard thing will be like when it's run in proper.
 
I must have read the manual wrong or got the info from some other source but I ended up revving to 4k for the first 50 odd miles before I checked the manual again. Ooops.
Have been keeping around 3k since but I'm still reading only 150 miles odo at present.
 
That's exactly why I do not follow Hyundai's silly "gentle 600 miles" bs, if you do not WOT in the first 60 miles, when your piston rings are expanding and in turn providing a better seal, then you've done nothing better for the engine.

It's especially funny when people drive like a grandma for 600 miles, then after that it's WOT and boost everywhere, like that literally makes no sense. Drive it how you want it to be driven for the rest of it's life or don't bother :)

Check this out: http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm
I think it was this article I was reading about ten/twelve yeas ago when I bought a brand new Honda Fireblade. Well, it was actually 2008 coz it was the new model year. So, I picked it up from the showroom and revved it "quite" hard the ten miles to work to show me mates an' all that. Not high load but full revs and continued that method until the first service. Within months, the bike was consuming more oil than a two stroke. Literally. On a Euro tour that year, I had to carry around with me two one litre bottles of oil just to get me around Spain and France. One litre of oil per 1000miles. When I got home I reported it to the dealer and the first question they asked me was did I run it in as per manufacturers instructions. Being honest, I said no. They said see yer.
Just need to mention that forums at the time had comments of other owners who had the same problems but it was never clear if they thrashed their machines from the off so it may have been an issue with some bikes. It was twelve years ago FFS so don;t ask me any more details.
 
I think it's one of those where you won't do any harm if you do run it in for the first 1000 miles, other than wasting your time and it being unnecessary. Far preferable in my eyes to the alternative of not running it in and potentially causing problems further down the line.
 
I think it's one of those where you won't do any harm if you do run it in for the first 1000 miles, other than wasting your time and it being unnecessary. Far preferable in my eyes to the alternative of not running it in and potentially causing problems further down the line.
Manual says 600 miles, where did 1000 come from?
I asked the dealer I bought mine from this week as we were sorting out the car tax, he’d never mentioned anything at handover.
He said Hyundai have never given them any guidelines direct but if asked they say take it easy for 1000 miles. I said the manual says 1000km/600miles but he didn’t really have any other view.
Probably has this debate on every car forum following a car purchase. I’ve run cars in then had them guzzle oil and not done it (company cars.... who cares :rolleyes:) and they have been fine, when it’s my car I’d rather err on the side of caution.
I do not have 1000 miles of patience through, 600 miles is my limit :cool:
 

speedking

Well-Known Member
"I was doing 74 officer".
Tip: this is not a good defence ;)

The point Garth was making is that you need to vary the revs during running in, not just sit on the motorway for a few hours at constant speed to get it done. Doing 3000 rpm in top gives you nowhere to go without exceeding the 3000 rpm recommendation.
 
1000 miles just used to be the 'standard', I'm clearly showing my age.

Obviously Hyundai use kilometres, but they still quote 1000...!

Just a round number in reality, much like 10000 steps per day.
 

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