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Engine Oil thread

#1
I wanted to start an official oil thread for the Veloster N before this site really takes off and we have 30 of these.

What oil will, or are you currently running in your car

Recommendations on brands ?

When did you swap your factory oil out for something better ?

Also what weight and why did you choose it ?
 

1FastStagea

Active Member
#2
Using this for winter here in Canada: https://products.liqui-moly.com/oils/special-tec-ll-5w-30-1.html
This specific version of 5w30 Liquimoly has excellent degradation qualities, and doesn't burn nearly as fast as most other 5w30 weight synthetic oils.

Will be switching to Motul 8100 X-Clean 5w40 for summer and track duty as that's my go-to high-grade oil that doesn't break the bank. Gong with a heavier weight in the summer since engine temps and stress will be higher, and racing does a number on your oil. Better to have the extra weight for those purposes.
 
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#3
Using this for winter here in Canada: https://products.liqui-moly.com/oils/top-tec-4200-5w-30-1.html
This specific version of 5w30 Liquimoly has excellent degradation qualities, and doesn't burn nearly as fast as most other 5w30 weight synthetic oils.

Will be switching to Motul 8100 X-Clean 5w40 for summer and track duty as that's my go-to high-grade oil that doesn't break the bank. Gong with a heavier weight in the summer since engine temps and stress will be higher, and racing does a number on your oil. Better to have the extra weight for those purposes.
Are you running the factory oil filter ? And is it the same one used on 90% of the Hyundai’s ?
 
#8
So after driving myself crazy for a few days trying to find an oil. I think I’m just going to stay with my good ole Pennzoil. I ran this in my VT with good luck. And the pricing is modest and as much as I want to switch to something more enthusiast dedicated like amsoil I can’t get behind the 60$ it’ll cost me to change it every 3k miles. And I know you can run it longer than that but something just stops me internally from going beyond that... I can still hear my dad screaming at me as a kid that he don’t care how good the oil is you change it every 3k and your car will out last you lol. I think if I start tracking the car and really driving it hard I might switch over to something like you guys posted but for now. My VN will be my weekend warrior car/daily. She may see a track 1-2x a year if that and I’m talking quarter mile tracks not autocross. Where I live there’s a lot of open back country roads which satisfy my itch to put her on a real track.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Pennzoil-Ultra-Platinum-5W-30-Full-Synthetic-Motor-Oil-5-qt/55291206
 
#9
So after driving myself crazy for a few days trying to find an oil. I think I’m just going to stay with my good ole Pennzoil. I ran this in my VT with good luck. And the pricing is modest and as much as I want to switch to something more enthusiast dedicated like amsoil I can’t get behind the 60$ it’ll cost me to change it every 3k miles. And I know you can run it longer than that but something just stops me internally from going beyond that... I can still hear my dad screaming at me as a kid that he don’t care how good the oil is you change it every 3k and your car will out last you lol. I think if I start tracking the car and really driving it hard I might switch over to something like you guys posted but for now. My VN will be my weekend warrior car/daily. She may see a track 1-2x a year if that and I’m talking quarter mile tracks not autocross. Where I live there’s a lot of open back country roads which satisfy my itch to put her on a real track.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Pennzoil-Ultra-Platinum-5W-30-Full-Synthetic-Motor-Oil-5-qt/55291206
Nothing wrong with Pennzoil's top-of-the-line oils at all, I totally forgot about them to be honest or else I'd recommend it myself lol. It's just when you want to get into a heavier oil your options become a bit more limited, that's all. Not sure if they offer a 5w40 in that same type of oil.
 
#10
Nothing wrong with Pennzoil's top-of-the-line oils at all, I totally forgot about them to be honest or else I'd recommend it myself lol. It's just when you want to get into a heavier oil your options become a bit more limited, that's all. Not sure if they offer a 5w40 in that same type of oil.
I was thinking of running the 5w30 for the winter. Unless you think I should run a heavier weight ? I figured I’m not going to push her too hard over the winter.
 
#11
I wish we got some of the euro oils over here, they look good. I may end up going back to amsoil myself but I agree that changing a more "common" oil more frequently would probably be better than buying an expensive oil and running it longer.

Another option would be Castrol Edge 0W-30, it's a heavier 30w and available in the states. Has worked well for me in the past. I didn't mess with 40w oils in my last car but now with forced induction I may consider it.

The one thing I'm unsure about is the current state of things concerning US gasoline and low saps oil. This will be my first DI car and I still don't think I've read the answer to reducing intake valve deposits but will probably try everything possible to counteract it. It sounds like the VI's breaking down in the oil may be a contributor so I was considering a 10W-30 while temps were moderate (assuming the manual states this is an acceptable choice)
 
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#12
I was thinking of running the 5w30 for the winter. Unless you think I should run a heavier weight ? I figured I’m not going to push her too hard over the winter.
Sorry, I should've specified. Yes, 5W40 for summer only. I'd stick with 5W30 for winter.

I wish we got some of the euro oils over here, they look good. I may end up going back to amsoil myself but I agree that changing a more "common" oil more frequently would probably be better than buying an expensive oil and running it longer.

Another option would be Castrol Edge 0W-30, it's a heavier 30w and available in the states. Has worked well for me in the past. I didn't mess with 40w oils in my last car but now with forced induction I may consider it.

The one thing I'm unsure about is the current state of things concerning US gasoline and low saps oil. This will be my first DI car and I still don't think I've read the answer to reducing intake valve deposits but will probably try everything possible to counteract it. It sounds like the VI's breaking down in the oil may be a contributor so I was considering a 10W-30 while temps were moderate (assuming the manual states this is an acceptable choice)
A pair of catch cans and a good quality gas and synthetic oil will help a lot, other than that there's not a whole lot you can do as far as I know that will make a significant difference in carbon build-up.
 
#13
Sorry, I should've specified. Yes, 5W40 for summer only. I'd stick with 5W30 for winter.



A pair of catch cans and a good quality gas and synthetic oil will help a lot, other than that there's not a whole lot you can do as far as I know that will make a significant difference in carbon build-up.
You think I should stick with the 0w30 for winter instead like the factory runs or bump up to the 5w30 ? Oils have never been my specialty. Even though I know that’s the life blood of the engine lol
 
#16
I haven't looked at the Pennzoil but when comparing other 0W-30 against 5W-30 it seemed like the cold weather advantage of the 0w wasn't really noticeable until you got down below 0. Anything above that the 5w was just as good.
 
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#17
I haven't looked at the Pennzoil but when comparing other 0W-30 against 5W-30 it seemed like the cold weather advantage of the 0w wasn't really noticeable until you got down below 0. Anything above that the 5w was just as good.
Sounds good ! My area very rarely will see anything close to zero. Maybe with windchill factored in you may get one or two days a year but that’s it. I think I’ve made my decision on the Pennzoil Ultra Platinum 5w30 for my winter oil and then I’ll bump up to a 5w40 for summer if I start pushing her hard.
 
#18
As long as the oil provides sufficient wear resistance via additive packs, there is absolutely 0 need to run a higher viscosity in summer. That is an outdated, dogmatic mindset. Thicker viscosity doesn’t protect better, the chemicals in the additive packs provide wear resistance. Fluids are not compressible.

Also, the majority of wear happens at startup and during warmup. A 0W will get to operating temperature faster than a 5W will, at any ambient temperature. This is critical to minimizing wear.

Easy break-ins by the owner’s manual are just for OEMs to cover their asses so you don’t wreck the car while becoming familiar with it. Many OEMs will go through each gear, WOT to redline right off the assembly line to start the ring-sealing process. BMW, in particular, is famous for doing this. It should be completed by the owner putting a lot of load on the rings in the first 20 miles, swap oil to get all the garbage out and again after 100-200 miles or so to see if any other larger metal bits are present. If not, you’re done & good to go.

Oil consumption, blow-by, poor efficiency and low power issues are caused by insufficient ring sealing due to lenient break-ins.

Don’t take my word for it, though. Do your own research. Talk to experienced engine builders from several platforms.
 
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#19
The only time I look at 40 weights is when I see the manufacturer recommend it for the same engine for the rest of the world but they suggest 30 weight for north america. Then i wonder how much fuel mileage regulations here affects the thinner recommendation. But yeah the thinnest oil that protects is what I look for.

As far as cold weather pumpability I was surprised to see that while 0w have more vi's that allow it to flow better at ultra low temps it was often times thicker than the same oil in a 5w at temps over freezing. Every oil is different and this may not have been the norm.

I used the mototune break in on my last car and it turned out well. I like to break in the clutch etc easy with smooth inputs and don't rip on the car but won't baby the engine.
 
#20
MotoMan FTW. You can put load on the rings by doing lots of engine braking if you are scared to go WOT to redline.

No such thing as oil weights, but oil grades.

I’ll happily use a 0W-20 PAO or ester (both are true full synthetic) oil that has excellent wear resistance and not worry at all. 0W-16 when they get more prominent.

For minimizing the accumulation of hydrocarbon (& other) deposits in the combustion chambers, a true combined and heated AOS that returns oil to the pan/system is optimal for a closed system.

Catch cans are ok only if you set them up properly and only if they filter well, but their maintenance quickly gets old.

Both the breather outlet and PCV outlet should be filtered by a separate quality catch can after break-in to see how much oil each outlet produces before routing back to their respective destinations.

Ideally you want to keep the cans warm enough to prevent fuel and water from precipitating out and ONLY CATCH OIL. I’ve seen thousands of owners putting cans far away from the engine and catching everything, having to dump contents much more often, contents freezing, etc. Water and fuel leftovers are a normal part of the combustion process, so you want to at least recycle those back through the PCV system.

Breather outlet water/fuel content is slightly more concerning, since you don’t want fuel remnants going through a hot turbo compressor, so filtration on the breather can needs to be very efficient. Keeping the breather can heated is subjective and arbitrary.

Heated cans can be smaller while unheated cans should be larger.

The better you seal your piston rings, fewer blow-by contents will result.

Once you monitor the individual catch can outputs for a few thousand miles, then decide if you want to switch to a larger combined catch can or a proper AOS.
 
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