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i30N lemon

R Veloster N

Well-Known Member
Mar 5, 2019
5,151
3,932
113
Rocky Mountains, US
It's all a matter of practice. The more you think reasonably, the better off you'll be. If you want to get mad or frustrated, do it but don't live there. Do it and let it go, as many times as you need to.:) If we can be gentle and kind to others, we can do so with ourselves.:)
 

theories

Member
Nov 29, 2019
12
32
13
Canberra
Quick update.....semi-productive discussions ongoing with Lennock who are waiting on advice now from Hyundai Australia. I am still in conversation with the HA COO and hope he can provide high level assistance from head office. Also received advice from ACT Fair Trading, ACCC in relation to Australian Consumer Law obligations and ACAT. Still holding my breath and hope to have some resolution in the next few days....will keep you posted!
 

theories

Member
Nov 29, 2019
12
32
13
Canberra
Have now had a very positive discussion with the Ops Manager at Lennock who has provided a level of assurance that they are now working with HA to ensure some sort of outcome. I have also had a message from HA senior management that they are reviewing the matter.
 

mickjf

Member
Oct 19, 2019
42
66
18
Canberra
That's good news. Given my experience with them of a few weeks ago where a salesman flat out lied about a conversation we had, make sure you do everything in writing including follow up notes of any phone calls. Also I'd still insist they keep the parts just in case it doesn't go well and you need a second opinion.

If they are trying to be accommodating, more than likely they'll offer to go halves in the cost of replacing the parts. So if they come back with a "you pay $2k and we fix it" I'd take that offer. Otherwise by the time you pay towing and the cost of replacing it all elsewhere or fighting it in ACAT you'll be behind.

Then like me just never go back there again.
 

Cavaco90

Well-Known Member
Mar 26, 2019
348
312
63
Portugal
And perhaps, besides the written notes, tape any future conversation you have. You might not need it, you might not be allowed to use it but at least if there is some dodgy salesman (as stated by @mickjf), you can always refer you have proof of some conversation that "never happen", or the other way around.
 

theories

Member
Nov 29, 2019
12
32
13
Canberra
Latest update....car now fixed and picked up! Not sure exactly what occurred for this to happen but happy to have it back without having to pay anything. Still not sure whether the new clutch is now covered for another period of warranty? Thanks for all the comments and will report back with any more updates.
 

mickjf

Member
Oct 19, 2019
42
66
18
Canberra
Still not sure whether the new clutch is now covered for another period of warranty?
It all depends upon whether they did the repair as a "goodwill" gesture or as a warrantable failure. If it's the former then you probably just get 12months/10000km. If it's the latter you should be covered till the end of your original warranty period. Worthwhile getting clarification.

Also it might be too late now but even if they're doing it as a goodwill gesture I'd still ask for the original worn parts or photos. It may still be the case that it was a genuine warranty issue and by going the goodwill path figure they'll shut you up and they minimise their exposure to future warranty claims. Ford did this to thousands of owners.

I've bought about ten new cars in the last 15 years and honestly I can't remember manufacturers being this bad in backing up their products. The standard response is to deny claims, blame the customer and play the odds. Hopefully what the ACCC are doing to Mazda will put the rest on notice.

https://www.news.com.au/technology/...s/news-story/2f20bb8816d756e0c13b2c5a7d52fe52
 

GazmaN

Moderator
Staff member
Oct 28, 2018
1,651
2,742
113
Darwin, Australia
The standard response is to deny claims, blame the customer and play the odds.
I saw this first hand when I worked as a service advisor for a well-known Japanese manufacturer many moons ago. We had a particularly vicious warranty clerk nicknamed 'The Nazi', a moniker he wore with pride. Working in unison with the workshop manager (I can't repeat his nickname) hundreds of no-brainer warranty claims were denied in the short time I was there. They took great pleasure in it, like it was some sort of game. I felt so sorry for the customers I eventually quit in disgust (that was only the tip of the iceberg, though).

Thanks for posting the article.
 

Stash-N

Well-Known Member
May 24, 2018
1,545
2,994
113
Adelaide Australia
It all depends upon whether they did the repair as a "goodwill" gesture or as a warrantable failure. If it's the former then you probably just get 12months/10000km. If it's the latter you should be covered till the end of your original warranty period. Worthwhile getting clarification.

Also it might be too late now but even if they're doing it as a goodwill gesture I'd still ask for the original worn parts or photos. It may still be the case that it was a genuine warranty issue and by going the goodwill path figure they'll shut you up and they minimise their exposure to future warranty claims. Ford did this to thousands of owners.

I've bought about ten new cars in the last 15 years and honestly I can't remember manufacturers being this bad in backing up their products. The standard response is to deny claims, blame the customer and play the odds. Hopefully what the ACCC are doing to Mazda will put the rest on notice.

https://www.news.com.au/technology/...s/news-story/2f20bb8816d756e0c13b2c5a7d52fe52
My understanding is if the dealer / manufacturer paid for /supplied the replacement parts whether that be warranty or goodwill then they are not obliged to give them to the customer. They own them legally.
Photos could go either way. If the legal department thinks it could go against them in the future then no photos either IMO.
This is all about minimising brand reputation damage. Never forget everyone is primarily doing this for the money not the love or motoring. It is all understandable really.
Manufactures like Hyundai / Kia and a few others care about their brand reputation in Australia at least.
Some other manufacturers are short sighted and don't give a rat's "a..e" about brand reputation or after sales support. You know who you are and you will go the way of the Dodo eventually.
Anyone want to buy a US owned "local brand" dealership? I heard they are going cheap. Get in quick though as you might only have 12-18 months before they go bye bye. :cool::) Australia's own car just got pulled from the US market where the same car is sold under a different name I have heard. Queue the sound of a toilet flushing.:eek:
 

Davo01

Well-Known Member
Jan 28, 2019
415
532
93
South Australia
And perhaps, besides the written notes, tape any future conversation you have. You might not need it, you might not be allowed to use it but at least if there is some dodgy salesman (as stated by @mickjf), you can always refer you have proof of some conversation that "never happen", or the other way around.
Audio Recoding another person without their knowledge and permission is illegal in Australia and elsewhere - this is why CCTV has no audio. I would advise against it without telling them you are doing it.

The best option is to summarize the conversations etc and email it to them. It’s in writing then, and they would have to expressedly dispute it.

Edit: not necessary now! A great outcome!
 
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R Veloster N

Well-Known Member
Mar 5, 2019
5,151
3,932
113
Rocky Mountains, US
It's varies from state to state in the US. Some states you can do so as long as your not recording their faces. Some, you don't even have to advise the individual you are audio recording. Still others you have to notify the individual/s you're recording the conversation before hand.

Personally, I'd record the conversation with a digital recorder, the transcribe it to paper or computer, then erase the recording and email them with the transcribed conversation.

What comes out of their mouth they're responsible for, no matter recorded or not. Everything is on a business level, nothing personal.

Absolutely, tell them your recording the conversation. This way you can quote them directly. If they don't give you permission then transcribe the conversation on paper via outline right in front of them. This way they know you mean business and it's recorded for posterity sake.
 

mickjf

Member
Oct 19, 2019
42
66
18
Canberra
My understanding is if the dealer / manufacturer paid for /supplied the replacement parts whether that be warranty or goodwill then they are not obliged to give them to the customer. They own them legally.
Photos could go either way. If the legal department thinks it could go against them in the future then no photos either IMO.
This is true but it becomes a very grey area. The current action against Mazda claims customers "weren’t given enough information about what caused the faults". Ford also did the same with the Powershirt debacle and said they were doing goodwill repairs when they knew they were warrantable defects (the judgement is absolutely damning of their behaviour).

I went through a 12 month fight with Ford during which time they completely rebuilt a manual gearbox, replaced 2 broken driveshafts and a cracked rear engine mount only for it to fail 2 months later. They then replaced the entire gearbox within 2 days, threw out the old one and presented it to me as fixed. I knew there was an inherent problem in the driveline but as they kept trying to fix it, it limited my legal options. In the end I just sold the car as the process to wait for what I believed was another inevitable failure and make a claim through the courts was going to take another year at least.

For the OP I would push hard to get evidence as to why they came to the conclusion they did. If it was a genuine warrantable defect and it happens again, you should be able to claim it.
 

Wayneofwolves

Active Member
Sep 12, 2019
119
66
28
West Midlands England
Hi
Just been reading this thread my i30N as 2k miles (12 months old) and get clutch burning smell regular it’s also so easy to stall,I have asked Hyundai to check it and they say it’s fine. Been driving 40 years and never had a clutch in that time in previous cars.
So it’s a bit concerning why I get the smell at low revs. Never abuse the car and never used Launch control.
 

Manted

Well-Known Member
May 3, 2018
259
274
63
Buxton
Hi
Just been reading this thread my i30N as 2k miles (12 months old) and get clutch burning smell regular it’s also so easy to stall,I have asked Hyundai to check it and they say it’s fine. Been driving 40 years and never had a clutch in that time in previous cars.
So it’s a bit concerning why I get the smell at low revs. Never abuse the car and never used Launch control.
Mine was exactly the same used to stall a fair bit once when I turned into a junction with oncoming cars very scary.Yes I used to get the clutch smell a fair bit which was annoying.
 

MPSFunjet

Active Member
Apr 24, 2018
148
166
43
Australia
Hi
Just been reading this thread my i30N as 2k miles (12 months old) and get clutch burning smell regular it’s also so easy to stall,I have asked Hyundai to check it and they say it’s fine. Been driving 40 years and never had a clutch in that time in previous cars.
So it’s a bit concerning why I get the smell at low revs. Never abuse the car and never used Launch control.
Easy to stall? It comes with anti-stall - that's the annoying increase in rpm when you let the clutch out. That doesn't sound normal
 

MPSFunjet

Active Member
Apr 24, 2018
148
166
43
Australia
Audio Recoding another person without their knowledge and permission is illegal in Australia and elsewhere - this is why CCTV has no audio. I would advise against it without telling them you are doing it.

The best option is to summarize the conversations etc and email it to them. It’s in writing then, and they would have to expressedly dispute it.

Edit: not necessary now! A great outcome!
Recording audio without consent is not permissible, however recording for the purpose of recalling facts is ok. You must transcribe it as a diary entry or the like.