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How To: Airbox Removal

coxy 2 carpets

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Apr 22, 2018
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So, I've had a slow Sunday and decided to have a little play around and remove the airbox just to see how much room is available with it out and what options there will be when induction kits start coming out.

I thought I'd document this so when induction kits do come out so the air box needs removing, people have got a guide to come to so they can see how easy it is to remove.

First of all there are two clips with need undoing from the air feed, just take either a trim tool or a small watch makers screw driver and pop these out, just make sure you don't drop it like I did.. :rolleyes:IMG_1232.jpg

After they are poped out, you need to loosen off the V-band clamp from the air box outlet, be careful not to fully undo this as it is a pain to get back on, just loosen it enough to be able to slide the pipe off the air box. You can either use a 10mm socket on this or a phillips head screwdriver.IMG_1236.jpg

Once that is loosened off, gently remove the pipe off the air box, it shouldn't take too much force, just wiggle it around and pull it to the side.


Next, the three bolts which attach the air box to the car need removing, these are all 10mm bolts with a single wash each, again, don't drop these.

Bolt 1: Just in front of the battery, may be covered by the material cover wrapped around the battery.
Bolt 2: Just infant of the fuse box on the right hand side.
Bolt 3: On the front of the air box towards the right hand side, on the same support beam as bolt 2.
IMG_1235.jpgIMG_1234.jpgIMG_1233.jpg

After all attaching parts are removed, simply wiggle and remove the air box from the vehicle. It is that easy.

Hope this helps anyone, ill attach some images below as the how it looks removed from the car.

Cheers,
 

paul-h

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Dec 15, 2017
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Good job!

My initial thoughts are can you turn the cold air feed up side down and blank the holes it leaves? I can’t picture the setup but this may put the feed into better air flow?

As I’ve said before manufacturers do this for a reason but the reasons could be to make it harder for the intake to suck in water from large puddles etc...
 

Cygnus X-1

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Jul 25, 2018
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Documenting for science! Love it!

Any chance you could also remove the intake tube and measure the inside diameter and outside diameter of the curved hard pipe connected to the compressor inlet?

From a laminar airflow perspective, the feed routing is far from ideal.
 

coxy 2 carpets

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2018
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Sheffield UK
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Good job!

My initial thoughts are can you turn the cold air feed up side down and blank the holes it leaves? I can’t picture the setup but this may put the feed into better air flow?

As I’ve said before manufacturers do this for a reason but the reasons could be to make it harder for the intake to suck in water from large puddles etc...
can't quite get in my head what you mean by that?
 
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Cygnus X-1

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Just disconnect the tube, take measurements and reconnect the tube. Should take no longer than 10m. Someone else want to have a crack at this?
 

paul-h

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can't quite get in my head what you mean by that?
The cold air feed that is attached to the front of the airbox, can it be pulled off, turned 180 degrees so that it is now pointing downwards?

It probably won’t work but was just a thought!
 

coxy 2 carpets

Well-Known Member
Apr 22, 2018
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Sheffield UK
www.instagram.com
The cold air feed that is attached to the front of the airbox, can it be pulled off, turned 180 degrees so that it is now pointing downwards?

It probably won’t work but was just a thought!
I can’t fully remember if it was molded it’s the air box or just fitted on, however that then connects to the ‘cold’ air feed that’s hid away in the front bumper so then you would just be sucking in air from the engine bay and not getting any ram air into the box if that makes sense?
 
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Cygnus X-1

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Add removal of the feed section from the airbox as another action item, as long as it can be done without breaking it.
 

paul-h

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Dec 15, 2017
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I can’t fully remember if it was molded it’s the air box or just fitted on, however that then connects to the ‘cold’ air feed that’s hid away in the front bumper so then you would just be sucking in air from the engine bay and not getting any ram air into the box if that makes sense?
I’m with you! Good man!
 

Cygnus X-1

Well-Known Member
Jul 25, 2018
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All modern Hyundai engines are MAP-based (speed density) only; i.e., there is no MAF sensor. Something they actually got right.

MAF-based systems are outdated and troublesome. Quite a few other platform communities recommend “failing the MAF” and converting to speed density for more consistent tuning.
 
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