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Suspension and Chassis DIY coilovers?

MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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Hey all,

I don't have an N car at all let alone a Hyundai/Kia (I have a '94 MR2) but this car piqued my interest. I noticed that there are only a handful of suspension options even though the platform is already a couple years old.

Has anyone thought about doing a DIY style coilover using the stock shocks and using linear springs that are about the same rate or slightly increased from stock? I was thinking this would be a good street coilover route especially if it's paired with the Mando suspension module. It would retain use of the factory adjustable shocks but allow for height adjustability.

The front would require cutting off the factory spring perch and either bolting on a split clamp collar or welding on a perch to hold the coilover sleeve.

Examples:

Sleeves, perches, and collars:

From there you can use an upper spring perch for the front that can be bought from various places (mine were bought from Apexi to use a 65mm ID spring) but they can also be bought from Godspeed, BC, Fortune Auto, etc. Many of these companies will use the same Koyo 6204Z bearing.

Koyo bearing: https://bearingsize.info/catalogue-...ll-bearings/bearing-6204z-koyo-obj120038.html

Springs: I'd recommend Swift or Hyperco

The only issue I see is the front strut mounts. As I don't own an i30N or VN, I can't take any guestimates. I've seen the AST camber plate and, to me, I think one of the universal eBay camber plates will work.

AST: AST camber plates
eBay: Universal camber plates
There are also circular and square-shaped camber plates as well. I doubt these eBay ones use the NMB bearings that are often used for camber plates but if replacements are needed: Camber plate bearings

As for the rears, if we know the specs, something like this might work: Rear height adjusters

The only issue would be securing the rear perch and spring. From this video, the rear spring looks pretty linear but I can't tell if it tapers in up top. VN suspension
 
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R Veloster N

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Mar 5, 2019
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No not possible with the VN or i30N. It has a electronically adjustable magnetic ride suspension. We utilize a Mando SDS ESC10 Module, that allows 100% complete control of the electronic suspension.

There are specific coilover components made for the VN & i30N that eliminate the the servo module and allow the replacement of the struts themselves. However, this eliminates the magnetic ride adjustability, which is unique to both models and something that is not sought after by owners of either model.

Specifically manufactured camber plates, as well as camber bolts and lowering springs are available from performance suspension manufactures for the VN and i30N. There is no need to hack up the struts and simply nothing to gain by doing so.

If you utilize the search engine at the top f the page, you'll find a plethora of information regarding VN and i30N suspension modifications.

Welcome and enjoy the forum.:)

It is customary to introduce yourself to the forum member and please take the time to read the forum rules. They're pretty much self explanatory.
Make sure you utilize the search engine at the right hand top of the forum. It will help to quickly find ongoing discussions for just about anything you're interested in. There is a plethora of information here to glean thru and ponder.
 
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MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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I appreciate the input and feedback, have already read through the rules, and I've already done some fairly extensive searching before I posted but did not find anything regarding coilovers and the ability to retain the factory electronic suspension controls. I fail to see why it would not be possible. The only thing that will get hacked up on the factory strut body would be the factory spring perch and welding on a new one or using a split clamp collar if there is no access to a welder. There would be no alteration done to the shock itself or its electronic control system - just the body of the strut housing.

As mentioned in my initial post, I was suggesting this method specifically because it would allow owners to retain the use of the electronically controlled suspension but would also allow for ride height adjustment and in turn, corner balancing their car for the track, if needed.

As far as camber plates go, this would allow for increasing negative camber and as it seems the VN suffers from a lack of negative camber. There would also be one more advantage that I can think of - dialing in more negative camber at the camber plate would allow for wider wheels and tires to be used and then camber adjustment bolts at the hub can be used to dial back the amount of camber (if need be) to a degree that would provide optimum contact patch to the road based off tire temperatures across the contact patch. So far, I have only seen the AST camber plate which costs 800+. It literally looks like a cut down version of the eBay camber plates I posted.

As far as springs go, it really depends on the intended usage. If it's purely a street or show car, drop springs (which are almost always progressives in rate) would be fine. However, if you want consistency and predictability, linear rate springs are what you need.

Since I don't have an N or modeling software, I can't model things such as camber curves, bump steer, roll center and its movement and the likes but it seems like dynamic camber would be a good starting point thus adding positive caster by using SuperPro's offset caster bushings would be a good, cheap start.

I'm not trying to stir anything up but I really don't see many offerings in the suspension department at all. I'm just trying to offer an option that some may be interested in - a coilover that will retain the use of the factory shocks and its electronic controls.
 
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R Veloster N

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As I stated before, "there's no reason to hack up anything that has to do with the electronic magnetic ride suspension on either the VN or i30N."

A closer search, would have easily have uncovered information on a coil over conversion for the i30N & VN, the Mando SDS ESC10 for both the VN and i30N and other direct information regarding camber plates, sway bars, etc. There is a performanced manufactured coil over conversion in Germany available for the i30N. Which I'd imagine will fit the VN as well. It retains the factory electronic struts , spring perch and controls. Forge Motorsport is making available Camber Plates as well, which are a direct fit along with the AST and a few others.

I'll be testing Forge Motorsport Camber Plates directly, once they've been received.

With the number of camber bolts available from at least 4 different manufactures, you can get up to +/- 2 degrees of camber with one set. With upper and lower camber bolts +/- 3 degrees adjustability. There is simply no need to go any further for even track or autocross or autoX applications.

What you're proposing is simply piecemeal and DIY, with no direct supporting, pertinent references or information.
Since I don't have an N or modeling software, I can't model things such as camber curves, bump steer, roll center and its movement and the likes but it seems like dynamic camber would be a good starting point thus adding positive caster by using SuperPro offset caster bushings would be a good, cheap start.
Exactly, it's a moot point as you don't have access to a VN or i30N to; properly measure or fit, let alone manufacture the correct parts. DIY parts are not the way to go, when messing with performance steering or suspension geometries.

Everything that's been alluded to or referenced, is already being manufactured by reputable performance part manufacturers. So once again, utilizing untested and cheap eBay parts is also a moot point. With a thorough search of this forum and manufactures of performance tested parts for the VN and i30N, all the aforementioned information and modifications are at your fingertips. So there's simply no reason to reinvent the wheel so to speak.

I suggest you go back and do a more thorough search of this forum and VN performance parts dealers, which will uncover the specific references and modifications.
I'm not trying to stir anything up but I really don't see many offerings in the suspension department at all.
I don't believe anyone alluded to such a reference. I think if perusing the many VN performance manufactures of both performance suspension and engine parts, you'll quickly see such a DIY project is unnecessary. Not worth the risks or other issues, that will most definately arise.

Further, the DIY project being proposed is a direct violation of Hyundai's Warranty and will void any possibility of an owner having a related issue, covered under warranty. Keeping in mind; Hyundai has a 5 year/60K & 10 year/100K warranty. Something a 2005 or prior/MR2 Toyota did not or does not have. The VN and i30N are in there third model year of production since inception and no where near surpassing the current offered Hyundai warranty.

Are you planning or have intentions of purchasing a VN in the near future?:)
 
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MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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Thanks again for your reply, R Veloster N. I would have much preferred an i30N as not having the same amount of doors on both sides really irks me and I prefer the i30N tail lights over the VN ones. However, it is still a car that I can see myself purchasing in the future. If the i30N Fastback came to NA, I'd definitely pick that up even though it is detuned on the chassis side a bit.

I've read through the thread for the Mando module which is why I suggested using this method in conjunction with the Mando module. If there were references to an available coilover in that thread, I may have missed it or skipped a page.

As far as camber plates go, I'm aware of the AST camber plate but it's for the OEM suspension and I would assume the Forge units are for the OEM suspension as well. Coilovers will need a different style of camber plate to accept the upper spring perch used with a 60-65mm ID spring.

I'm only aware of five coilovers options available at the moment: ST, KW (owns ST), Ohlins, DGR, and Neotech. ST/KW, Ohlins, and DGR do not retain the factory ECS as can be seen from product pictures and a forum member stated that the Neotech doesn't either according to this thread: https://n-cars.net/forums/threads/veloster-n-aftermarket-suspension.1674/. There is also the ST adjustable spring kit but that looks to use a progressive rear spring.

I did more forum and Google searching for the coilovers you stated that retain ECS but couldn't find anything. If you remember the brand, please do tell.

One more reason why I brought up this DIY route is keeping the factory damper because we don't know what type of damping profiles the aftermarket options are tuned with. With ST/KW, we can probably expect a good mix of street and some track as is usual with their setups but again, no ECS. I've looked and have never seen damper dynos for DGR or Neotech coilovers so we can't infer how well the valving profile would match the road conditions in North America. From a video I've watched, Hyundai had a team of engineers tune the suspensioin of the Australian i30N for Australian roads and I can only assume the same was done for North America. While the Neotechs may be tuned well for Korea, it may not perform well here. If you were part of the JDM craze when Japanese coilovers started flooded the market 20-30 years ago, you would know that many of their dampers did not suit North American roads as they were tuned for Japanese roads. With this DIY route, we can at least keep the factory damping profile as a constant and either keep the same spring rates as factory or increase them a bit depending on driving style.

Exactly, and it's a moot point, because you don't have access to a VN or i30N to measure or fit, let alone manufacture the correct parts.
True, I don't have the access to make the measurements or analyze the suspension through its range of motion but it doesn't take much to make the coilovers themselves. It's really nothing more than a threaded sleeve, adjustment collar, an upper spring perch, and a strut mount or camber plate assembly. The eBay camber plates have actually been used by many DIYers across the autocross and road course tracking community and have been for the past 15+ years. If the eBay rear height adjusters are a cause for concern, similar components can be bought from companies like BC or Ground Control. I've tracked using the eBay camber plates for a season now with no issues and when the bearing wears out, I know I can easily replace them with an NMB/Cusco bearing.

I appreciate your replies and anyone else's. I would like to see more aftermarket options available to this platform.
 
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RameusJH

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I haven't had time to read this thread 100%, but first of all, thank you @MRunabout for taking an interest in this. I would love to keep the electronic factory dampers, but have the ability to adjust height and spring rates. Thank you for those links, they may just give me enough impetus to figure this out on the N.

While I am not enthused about cutting off my spring perches, I have gone through the same thought process as you. I actually collected all the perches, springs, and bilsteins to do this on my last car but never finished the job before moving on to the N.

What you're suggesting has been done on a time attack Fastback N in Australia. See ~2:39 in
.

Your post makes me wonder, are you interested in picking up an N?
 

MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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@RameusJH, that's awesome and the car is even factory-backed! I thought I watched all of StreetFX's videos but I guess I missed this one. I even watched World Time Attack last year when they ran it as it was the only car I was interested in other than the Scorch S15.

Please do take caution when piecing the components together, though. For the MR2, the OD of the front and rear strut housings are different. If the same applies to the VN or i30N, different ID sleeves may have to be used. One thing a lot of people use to take up the slack between the sleeves and strut housing is to use tape - I'm using aluminum tape. If you don't already have one, I would invest in a caliper but since you've already previously pieced a set together, you probably already do.

Also, if you go to the video you posted, it looks like the wheels and/or tires are rubbing against the coilover collars and springs. This is because the factory perches sit above the tire but when converting to coilovers, the perch and spring are next to it. This is common in the MR2 scene and can be alleviated by spacers or adjusting the camber plates inboard to give more negative camber thereby allowing for better wheel/tire clearance and then adjusting the camber bolts (if they were bought and installed) at the hub to bring camber values back to where they should be.

The last issue I can think of would be the shock top nut and how to secure it against the camber plate. If you are considering the eBay camber plates, the ID of the bearing I posted is 18mm. I don't know what the sizing of the threaded portion on the shock shaft is on the N, but if you're lucky, they might just be the same Koni uses on their 8610 series race inserts - M14x1.5. If it is, what I did when I ordered by universal camber plates is ask the eBay seller if they could provide me with the bolts and studs needed to mount the camber plates to the chassis and the appropriate shock top shoulder nut. BC also carries 12mm and 14mm shock top nuts and camber plate bushings. Their 14mm shock top nut is M14x1.5 but I don't know the thread pitch of the M12 nut. Also, the length of the camber plate bushing needed to use with the Koyo 6204Z upper spring perch is 28mm. I'll post some pictures later.

Also, I emailed StreetFX and it seems that on their i30N (the blue one), they worked with MCA Suspension and even converted the rear to a coilover instead of a separate shock and spring setup. I'm not sure what the setup is on the sedan in the link is, though.

Yes, I am interested in the N but more so the I30N or the i30N Fastback. The three passenger door thing really does not sit well with my need for things to be even. It wouldn't be anytime soon but maybe a couple years from now.

@R Veloster N, that's the thing, though. I see five coilover options but none retain the factory ECS system.

While I understand about the warranty, there are already plenty of people doing modifications to their Ns that void their warranties. When I worked as a Toyota tech, we would only warranty TRD parts if they were installed by a Toyota technician. This may be similar to how Hyundai operates. I can't see them turning a blind eye to bolt-ons, piggyback tuners, catch cans, springs/coilovers, short shifters, etc.
 
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R Veloster N

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Sorry, the i30N hatchback or Fastback is not available in the US and there has been any talk from Hyundai ever will make it available. The Elantra N-Line 1.6T is the closest you'll get to it for now. Hyundai has no future plans to make the i30N available in the US, so it's a moot point.

Not to undermine or dampen the discussion; you're attempting to sermise hypothetical DIY's, with no first hand knowledge on the purposed cars. So, such a discussion holds no reality or validity with VN or i30N owners. Might I suggest, you purchase a VN/PP, do the purposed DIY modifications yourself. Then report back with the forum with the results. At this point, I see very little to no interest in such a DIY project.

I believe VN and i30N owners that are interested in such suspension modifications, will opt to spend their money on proven products designed, developed and manufactured and offered by reputable performance suppliers.
@R Veloster N, that's the thing, though. I see five coilover options but none retain the factory ECS system.
Keep looking your going to have to go outside the US into the Korean Home market for the VN. If the searching was conducted as suggested, you'd find your answer. A coil over spring kit conversion is available for the i30N stock electronic suspension and has been installed on several members i30N already. They will also fit the VN and it's from Germany. I can assure you, similar kits will be available in the US.;)

The VN and i30N are only in the second model year of production, so the performance market hasn't caught up. It will eventually so some personal patience is in order.
This maybe (optimal words) similar to how Hyundai operates. I can't see them turning a blind eye to bolt-ons, piggyback tuners, catch cans, springs/coilovers, short shifters, etc.
It's not and I can tell you with confidence. Instead of speculating check out the "Hyundai Track Warranty" thread first, then you'll see a little clearer. Obviously, you are not a Hyundai Technician or employed by them. We can speculate hypothetically all you like for as long as you want but to be frank, it's nothing but bench racing. :)

Have fun and enjoy the forum.:)
 
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MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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Sorry, the i30N hatchback or Fastback is not available in the US. Hyundai will not making the i30N available in the US, so it's a moot point.

You're attempting to discuss hypothetical scenarios that have reality or validity to VN or i30N owners.
I'm well aware that the I30N hatch and Fastback are not available in NA and that there are no plans to bring them over. I was just stating my preferences when I said that I would prefer those two over the VN. I've also alluded to that in an earlier post.

A coil over spring kit conversion is available for the i30N stock electronic suspension and has been installed on several members i30N already. They will also fit the VN and it's from Germany.
If what you're talking about is the height-adjustable spring kit from ST, I've already mentioned that product in a previous post. The only downsides are that you don't get to pick your spring rates and the rear looks to use a progressive spring instead of a linear spring.

The VN and i30N are only in the second model year of production, so the performance market hasn't caught up. It will eventually and patience is a virtue.
Which is why I was suggesting this route as it brings an option to the table that some may pursue. Every option I'm aware of doesn't retain the ECS and this was one of the main reasons why I brought up this option.

Might I suggest, you purchase a VN and do the purposed DIY modifications yourself then report back with the forum you personal success of such a project. So far there is little to no interest in such a DIY project.
I've already mentioned that the purchase of one is at least a couple of years down the road for me. If I had one, this process would have already been started but since I don't have one, I thought I'd ask and throw in as many links, brands, information, and whatnot out there for anyone that is interested. I went through the forums and searches and saw nothing exactly as I was describing which is why I posted. As @RameusJH posted, there was enough interest to convert to this method of coilovers that this was already done by a factory-backed i30N Fastback World Time Attack clubsport team in Australia.

It not, check out the "Hyundai Track Warranty," thread first, then you'll see a little clearer. Exactly, you not a Hyundai Technician. We can speculate hypothetically until the cows come home but it nothing but bench racing.
Fair enough. I went over the Hyundai Track Warranty. It states that blow-off valves, software tunes such as re-flashes, modules such as the JB4, Lap3, etc., and turbo upgrades are not covered under warranty while simple bolt-ons such as intakes, exhaust systems, and catch cans will still retain the warranty unless they cause damage to the vehicle. With that being said, there are still plenty of people voiding their warranties.

End of story and discussion. Have fun and enjoy the forum.:)
I stated in an earlier post that I wasn't trying to stir anything up and that's because your replies have an air of dismissiveness to them; as if this option is not worth the time of day for anyone to pursue. I have done my best to be civil and informative with my replies. Whatever information I brought up, I followed up with links or brought up brands to be as helpful as possible in anyone else's potential research efforts. I have done quite a bit of research but each reply you've posted either dismissed my points or you just stated that there is a product available or a product is in the works with no further information (aside from yourself working with Forge on camber plates and if they're not for coilovers, they would not pertain to this discussion) and to do more thorough research. If this is the end of your participation in this discussion, then I hope you have a good rest of your day.

I went onto MCA's website but either the coilovers made for the StreetFX car was just a one-off or could still be in development although the set was made nearly two years ago now.

If there is anyone with coilover information used on the WTA i30N car @RameusJH posted about, please do tell.
 

R Veloster N

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You are welcome to your opinion of my comments but again your incorrect. I live in reality, not unproven unknowns. This is all make believe, until you actually put the hypothesis into theory and practice. I'm sure you're familiar with this methodology. You have stated unequivocally are not prepared to do so. So one of the reasonable and plausible responses has followed

I've done all types of of development work for many different performance manufactures on this forum and elsewhere. You only have to search and learn. So, I'm speaking from experience, not unproven speculation. This is exactly what you're attempting to do and without access or ownership of either VN or i30N.

So what I'm saying is; all your rhetoric is simply a moot discussion, full of speculative unknowns until put into actual practice.
I stated in an earlier post that I wasn't trying to stir anything up and that's because your replies have an air of dismissiveness to them; as if this option is not worth the time of day for anyone to pursue.
Otherwise, do the personal diligence before you start pitching such a DIY project without any hands on experience or if you prefer, (put your money where your mouth is). Have fun enjoy the forum and relax.

Friendly advice; This forum is full of different nationalities and opinions. You may not agree with them but they're going to change them just because you want them to. Respect them and theirs and they'll respect you and yours.:)
 
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MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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You are welcome to your opinion of my comments but again your incorrect. I live in reality, not unproven unknowns. This is all make believe, until you actually put the hypothesis into theory and practice. I'm sure you're familiar with this methodology. You have stated unequivocally are not prepared to do so. So one of the reasonable and plausible responses has followed
We now know that this conversion of retaining the factory ECS while converting to an adjustable coilover is possible and has been done on an i30N which @RameusJH posted about so this hypothesis has already gone through theory, practice, and even stress-tested under race conditions.

Just because I don't have the car doesn't mean I can't ask if something has been done, someone is considering a modification, or suggest a potential option.

I've done all types of of development work for many different performance manufactures on this forum and elsewhere. You only have to search and learn. So, I'm speaking from experience, not hypothetical speculation. This is exactly what you're attempting to do and without access or ownership of either VN or i30N. I hoping you are beginning to understand this.

So what I'm saying is; all your rhetoric is simply a moot discussion, full speculative unknowns until put into actual practice.
I've made coilovers for other cars so based on my development work on other platforms, I knew this method had a high possibility of working out if the shock damping controller wasn't mounted in a problematic area. I asked simply out of curiosity and to provide information to any people who potentially wanted to go this route.

As RameusJH posted, this is no longer a moot discussion as it has already been done.

Otherwise, do the personal diligence before you start pitching such a DIY project without any hands on experience.. (put your money where your mouth is) saying it directly. Have fun enjoy the forum and relax.

This forum is full of different peoples and opinions. You may not agree with them but it's not going to change them because you want it to. People have different opinions than yours, respect them and they'll respect you and yours.
As stated above, I have hands-on experience doing this on other cars. I did do quite a bit of searching about this specific topic and I believe I've shown that I've done my due diligence.

You're right, we're all different and you and I may never see eye to eye. I have no problem with that as long as we can maintain civil discourse.

So, getting back on topic, does anyone have details on the suspension components used on that i30N Time Attack car?
 

R Veloster N

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We now know that this conversion of retaining the factory ECS while converting to an adjustable coilover is possible...........
This is not debatable. We've known about this for quite awhile, as the specific thread date denotes. So you're a bit behind the power curve, so to speak. However, wide distribution for the private market, is not been fully realized. It most certainly will and some patience is in order.
I've made coilovers for other cars so based on my development work on other platforms, ................
Truthfully speaking, you haven't gotten much response. You have shown no specific interest in putting into practice, what you are proposing for actual owners to engage in.

Such assertions have no validity for either VN or i30N owners. Rather or not you have experience has no bearing upon this discussion, is not debatable and is moot. Based upon your own comments and assertions, along with your personal selection of an 2005 Toyota (15 years old or later) MR2 ,most certainly doesn't demonstrate or reflect any current knowledge, experience or understanding with the Hyundai 2019/20 VN or i30N suspension configuration or dynamics.
As stated above, I have hands-on experience doing this on other cars. I did do quite a bit of searching about this specific topic and I believe I've shown that I've done my due diligence.(not really)..................
Your searching and spotlighting of particular undetermined/untested eBay components, along with plagiaristic selection of links and thread searches, is not doing the diligence required for such a DIY project. Additionally, you have no specifications for the struts, spring requirements, camber plates, etc to actually know if such parts will be compatible. So personal diligence in this area, hasn't been done either.

So, staying on topic as before; I believe civil discourse and personal tolerance has been maintained at least on my part, by staying with the facts and direct cross examination of your comment and opinions. Your personal feeling about my comments, have no validity and have moved beyond the analytical hypothetical fact finding. You are correct, "we will never see eye to eye," until you're prepared to put forth the money, effort, time to put your personal hypothesis into actual being, with the universal parts you have touted from eBay. Additionally, providing the specific feedback to the forum of a successful project. I've got no problem with bench racing but there is a limit to everything. :)

Because the Attack Hyundai Team has done so with their particular i30N, expertise and tooling, does nothing to prove your personal DIY hypothetical assertions, for either the VN or i30N and universal eBay parts. So, until you're prepared to do the personal diligence required with a VN and put such a DIY project into being such a discussion is moot. :) I will remind you, you've already reiterated your not prepared to do so. Your pretense of assuming this can be done with universal unproven ebay parts is a bit over the top, outdated and not related to the Hyundai platform.

Again, remember there are 6K plus owner members from around the globe, who have specific experience and working knowledge with both cars. Their opinions and comments are derived from actual hands on experience and daily use, not meer speculation.

Additionally, some of the forums members assist manufacturers with; hands on design, development and prototyping of performance parts for these two models, as stated previously. We provide opinions, comments and recommendations, backed by actual use of those performance products, along with feedback to forum members. So, validity is added to those comments and opinions.

Agreed with @GazmaN, Geoff Fears; is the individual to contact by PM regarding this subject with the Attack Hyundai i30N. He frequents the forum and provides support from time to time. I suggest you PM him directly for your specific interests.

Enjoy the forum, I appreciate your opinion and comments. However I simply don't agree with your purposed DIY project, especially without some personal hands on experience, with either platform.

I will continue to be considerate and conscientious towards your personal feelings, by civilly answering the questions and comments which you're directing towards me.:)
 
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MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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You know what, I was going to reply to all your comments but that would have derailed my thread even further. I started this thread to begin a discussion on this topic but our back and forth is not providing any progression toward this discussion. We obviously have different stances on the matter so how about we just agree to disagree and leave it at that?

I had already tried to contact Geoff via N-Performance.au but if Geoff replies here, that would be even better.
 
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R Veloster N

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Thank you no , I believe I'll stand by my comments and just continue to disagree. You're welcome to do whatever you choose. The thread isn't derailed but you're consistently taking the dirt road yourself. :)

Now tell me how you're going to prove your hypothesis with the universal eBay parts and the VN? I say this again, as you don't have access to an i30N and the front suspensions between the two are different as well.

There won't be any progress in the discussion, until you decide to buy a VN and do the diligence required with the universal parts you've touted.:) Beside this, The Attack Hyundai Team didn't utilize cheap universal eBay parts.

As I stated before, this is something we're already aware of as members. It won't help, you have no access or intention of putting forth any effort towards such a DIY Project, with eBay universal parts. If you're not financially prepared to put forth the effort, how can you possibly believe anyone else will take you seriously.:)

As I stated several times before, the discussion is simply "bench racing."
Bench racing is the official hobby; It's where people argue and debate over what can and can't be done based solely on what they've heard or something some friend of theirs has done. As opposed to posting statements based on facts.)
Otherwise, It's you have no factual information to draw with either VN or i30N and the universal eBay parts. I refuse to argue with you but stick to the facts. Hopefully you'll see a bit clearer.;)
 
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NULLOBANDITO

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Dec 17, 2018
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Could you folks get back on topic and stop arguing?

I haven't read through the details, but as pointed out in the video it's been done, and from what I understand @MRunabout wants to do pretty much that.

The question is how, without breaking the OEM shocks.

EDIT: If I'm honest, I'd also love to get my hands on those WTCR Fastback's springs.
 

RameusJH

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Mar 12, 2019
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Toronto
I think the upper strut mount and spring perch would be the main challenge, like you say @MRunabout , mainly due to space constraints. The ebay plate bearing ID would require some kind of sleeve insert. This would be relatively easy to have machined. A DIYer serious about a project like this wouldn't let this stop them though. Second, it looks like the damper piston rod would sit overall lower in either the ebay or AST mounts. On the stock strut mount, the shoulder of the damper piston rod is essentially in plane with the surface to which the strut mount mounts. In the ebay plate, the top of the spherical bearing looks to be at around the same height as the mounting surface, so the piston rod shoulder would be lower by the height of the bearing. This may not be an issue, but we'd have to determine the total compression and extension travel of the damper to ensure that if it sits lower, the piston rod does not bottom out before using up the bumpstop. Whatever kind of upper spring perch parts are needed would also take up some space at the top and some thought would have to go into what the perch is actually connecting to.

The spring length would also have to be selected to allow extension/compression travel without the spring binding. This may be why the WTA fastback N has the lower spring perch so low, they needed the spring length to ensure the spring doesn't bottom out first.

All of this is possible to overcome though.

Below is an envelope model of the stock strut mount, modeled based on my measurements. Pink piece is mostly a dummy to represent the vehicle body. Strut rod is also based on measurements, but I'm not certain that the thread continues all the way down to the shoulder. Haven't opened it up yet. You can see the strut rod shoulder comes nearly right to the mounting plane.

1598760889760.png



I was thinking o-rings between the sleeve and the strut body on my old project.

Thanks for all the input, I appreciate any car enthusiast who has an interest in growing our options and shares knowledge from other platforms, regardless of whether or not they own a Hyundai. I do love MR2s!
 
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MRunabout

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Jul 6, 2018
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Whoa, @RameusJH, you even whipped up a model of the mount, strut rod, and body! That's sweet!

Since you posted that video, what I was hoping was that the factory shocks had enough stroke to compensate for the amount of space taken up by the upper spring perch, camber plate, and lowering of the vehicle. It definitely looks like you and I both see this as a tall order for the OEM shocks; however, with this having been done by the WTAC team, I'll keep my fingers crossed for the N community that there will still be a good amount of usable shock stroke left after all is said and done.

Yes, once all is assembled, the rod would be compressed a bit/sit lower compared to stock. And yes, spring length will also play a factor. One of the reasons I suggested Swift and Hyperco springs is that they allow for a good bit of travel before binding.

I also thought about using o-rings but was worried about them breaking apart after so many heat cycles.

I took some measurements. If you're interested in me taking more, feel free to let me know. I'll upload them in a bit.

The threaded portion on my shocks have are 45mm and my upper spring perch + bearing + camber plate almost exactly line up with the top of the camber plate bearing when I install them all together. So, nearly 2" of stroke lost there alone.

The eBay camber plate manufacturer does use two different thicknesses of camber plates, though. The thicker flush mount ones, according to the seller, are 0.48" thick - so just a hair over 12mm. I can't seem to find a figure on the thinner ones but I can dig them out of the garage tomorrow to take a measurement.

I tried uploading some photos but the file sizes were too large. I'll try to compress and re-upload later.
 
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