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Engine Catch can

GE XL Vu scope used. It has an articulating tip. Dont know why but I looked up the value and new it is about 20K dollars. HOLY SHIZA!!!

Breather side looking down. 09:54, up close look at the collector. 09:57, this is where it gets tough. you can see an opening. unfortunately I was unable to manipulate the camera to enter so no more info. But you can clearly see there is oil throughout the entire cavity and pooling around the lowest point, the collector. I believe the collector located up higher is a redundant feature in case the lower has blockage. The remaining images are of the TB and the turbo blade. Both inlets are pristine, clean. I am going to try to enter through the PCV next but I will have to remove it first. Oh and the battery died on the scope.
 
The image of the throttle body is from behind. I entered through the intake manifold port of the PCV. And I must say it is impressively clean. This is a notorious area for build up even on NA cars.
 

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Make sure to get as small a tip as possible. I purchased one at home depot and it would not fit in cover ports at all. I just hit 4k miles this morning. My drive is half highway and street. The street driving is not stop and go though with a 50mph limit. Highway 70mph.
So really doing 60 and 80 respectively. I normally shift at 4kpm street and highway much higher dependent on traffic. I regularly hit WOT during my commute. Maybe driving style and and environmental conditions play a part I don't know.
Very nice ! Turbine blades look impressively clean ! Thanks man , I'm about to order a cheap scope today.
 
Make sure to get as small a tip as possible. I purchased one at home depot and it would not fit in cover ports at all. I just hit 4k miles this morning. My drive is half highway and street. The street driving is not stop and go though with a 50mph limit. Highway 70mph.
So really doing 60 and 80 respectively. I normally shift at 4kpm street and highway much higher dependent on traffic. I regularly hit WOT during my commute. Maybe driving style and and environmental conditions play a part I don't know.
Noted, thanks for the tip. Will keep this in mind. Driving conditions definitely play a part. Your driving conditions are ideal! Did you already change your oil or are you still running the break-in oil? I drive relatively the same way except I do have stop and go traffic in my weekly commute. On the weekends I have a lot of short trips around town. Stop and go traffic isn't really the issue related to carbon buildup. The issue is really short trips where the motor doesn't have enough time to reach operating temperature. Driving at a relatively slow speed is the best way to warm an engine but if the engine never gets to operating temps the piston rings wont be properly sealed against cylinder wall, leading to more blow-by. Location wise my rationale is the colder your environment (long winter) the harder it is going to be for you to keep the engine at/around operating temps if your doing short trips. Other location/environment conditions relating to carbon build-up and increased blow-by are outside my realm of knowledge. Maybe someone else has more insight.
 
Doing the oil change this weekend. And you beat me to the punch on cold temps. Very good point!

Noted, thanks for the tip. Will keep this in mind. Driving conditions definitely play a part. Your driving conditions are ideal! Did you already change your oil or are you still running the break-in oil? I drive relatively the same way except I do have stop and go traffic in my weekly commute. On the weekends I have a lot of short trips around town. Stop and go traffic isn't really the issue related to carbon buildup. The issue is really short trips where the motor doesn't have enough time to reach operating temperature. Driving at a relatively slow speed is the best way to warm an engine but if the engine never gets to operating temps the piston rings wont be properly sealed against cylinder wall, leading to more blow-by. Location wise my rationale is the colder your environment (long winter) the harder it is going to be for you to keep the engine at/around operating temps if your doing short trips.
 
Doing the oil change this weekend. And you beat me to the punch on cold temps. Very good point!
This is all very interesting. I'm really looking forward to studying more on the blow-by on my own vehicle. I have no extra boost but a good amount of oil captured. I should get lab reports back at the end of next week if I rush deliver my oil sample. If the fuel dilution is <.5% then that only adds more questions. If it is ~2% or higher (doubt it) that might explain the caught oil on my engine. Also looking forward to catch can results after the next 3K of using a "higher" grade of oil (Amsoil). Also another member on the VelosterN forum is close to 3K with the same can as me. Would be interested to see his results/driving style. Furthermore, I'm looking forward to doing some dyno pulls when the weather starts to turn around here as I want to establish a baseline before I do some smaller power-train mods like Intercooler in the spring.
 

Nomad17

Active Member
Anybody using the addw1 bracket, are you installing on the coolant overflow or the nut to the right of it? Seems to be sitting too high in this location but pretty sure that's where I see people attaching.

DSC03065-01~2.jpg
 
Digging through the service manual in my free time and found this in the emission control system section. Contrary to my initial understanding of the pcv system it appears that the pcv valve was designed to be open (to extract oily vapors) at all times the engine is operational. I previously was under the impression that the pcv valve closed under high load/high boost and oily vapors were forced through the breather tube. This justifies the significance of installing a can on the pcv side if one is only going to run one can.

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Don't mean to be critical, just trying to understand how this could physically be possible. How could a vacuum be generated, or at least a pressure in the IM where the PCV hose attaches that is lower than the valve cover pressure, when under boost? Even if there were some form of venturi in the runner, I'm not sure its feasible to achieve a vacuum relative to the valve cover when there's boost. A venturi in the runner would have other issues too I think (packaging, different characteristics from one runner to another...).

I think at the end of the day, we spend more time driving our cars not in boost than in boost, so the most effective place for a catch can should be the PCV to IM. In this location it would be useful most of the time. I have also been wondering how, if gases were to run in reverse up the breather tube when under boost, where the crankcase breathes from in that case?

Edited to point out i'm not trying to be a critic :)
 
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Don't mean to be critical, just trying to understand how this could physically be possible. How could a vacuum be generated, or at least a pressure in the IM where the PCV hose attaches that is lower than the valve cover pressure, when under boost? Even if there were some form of venturi in the runner, I'm not sure its feasible to achieve a vacuum relative to the valve cover when there's boost. A venturi in the runner would have other issues too I think (packaging, different characteristics from one runner to another...).

I think at the end of the day, we spend more time driving our cars not in boost than in boost, so the most effective place for a catch can should be the PCV to IM. In this location it would be useful most of the time. I have also been wondering how, if gases were to run in reverse up the breather tube when under boost, where the crankcase breathes from in that case?

Edited to point out i'm not trying to be a critic :)
It's good to question everything. I'm not totally sure how this is possible either, hence why I was always under the impression the pcv valve was forced closed under boost (to avoid pressuring the valve cover). This is the service manual for the 2.0 T-GDI Theta II and the pages before/after the ones I previously provided show CAD of our engine bay/components including the turbo. Maybe Hyundai dropped the ball with the pcv diagram for this platform (which would be unfortunate). I am not 100% sure here, but it is the information provided by them for our engines. I see the pcv schematic table has a column for high load/acceleration but doesn't mention boost at all. As far as the vapors going through the breather tube , this scenario should happen when there is a high volume of blow-by (high load/acceleration). The built up blow-by should vent under its own pressure and with the help of a vacuum from the turbo (airbox/filter creates restriction leading to vacuum between airbox and turbo). So in this case the crankase would be venting ("breathing") all that excess blow-by coming from the cylinders. Under normal load/acceleration the fresh air coming from the breather is used to sweep the blow-by out of the system. Attached are the pages surrounding the pcv section showing CAD that matches our VN's 2CA1893D-F1F8-4D57-B883-CBCAB6133E57.jpeg 31D9B4FB-632E-43AE-9ED3-DB9884950E97.jpeg
 

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